Herniated Disc Treatment in Garden City, MI

Severe back pain and decreased mobility might be the sign of a herniated disc – sometimes called a slipped disc. Discs in the spine, like cushions between the vertebrae, act as shock absorbers. The discs consist of a fibrous outer layer and softer inner layer. When the outer layer is damaged, it results in a herniated disc where the inner jelly-like substance pushes through a tear.

Herniated Disc

Factors that can increase the risk of a herniated disc include occupation, weight, and genetics. Repetitive strain on the back, prevalent in jobs that require physical tasks like heavy lifting, frequently cause herniated discs.

Besides occupation, excess body weight increases the stress on discs. So much so that when the disc presses on nearby nerves, it can result in pain, tingling, numbness, and weak back.

What’s more, herniated discs are often caused by disc degeneration, which is age-related wear and tear. Aging also causes discs to lose their water, making them more prone to tearing or rupturing.

If the affected disc is in the lower back – lumbar spine – the pain travels through the buttocks, and down through the legs and into the feet. Whereas, if the herniated disc is in the neck – cervical spine – the pain radiates down through the arm, and into the fingers. Often the pain increases in certain positions, or during specific movements or actions. For instance, when you cough or sneeze the pain might shoot down the arm or leg. Regardless of symptoms, the pain from herniated discs can be debilitating, and when left untreated, herniated discs can lead to permanent nerve damage.

Back Lower Pain

Herniated disc treatment includes a diagnosis from a chiropractor who will then

suggest appropriate steps to recovery, which includes adjustments to posture if that is found to be an underlying cause.

Let Drs. Adam and Amanda Apfelblat help bring you better health and a better way of life through chiropractic wellness care by calling and making an appointment today.

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