How Long Does It Take Tennis Elbow to Heal?

Lisa Gladman blog

Tennis Elbow to Heal

Lateral epicondylitis, a condition also known commonly as tennis elbow, is when the outer elbow becomes tender and often painful due to excessive use of the forearm, commonly as a result of sports that involve racquets such as tennis. The condition usually occurs as a gradual building up of pain over time and can cause intense arm pain, eventually restricting further use of that arm for sports or physical activity for quite some time if left. It is recommended you seek out arm pain doctors for the best recovery from the condition.

The healing time for tennis elbow largely depends on how you treat the condition, and if left untreated it can become an almost permanent condition in the long term. If treated, the condition should heal within the space of one to two years. However, this also depends on the severity of the lateral epicondylitis and healing time may be shorter or longer than this timeframe.

How to Diagnose Tennis Elbow?

If experiencing pain in the outer elbow area, after repetitive strenuous movements of the forearm over time, it is suggested to seek arm pain doctors for diagnosis and potential treatments. Once suspected, it is recommended to immediately stop any use of the affected arm and relax it until diagnosis, and a treatment plan have been made. The most common form for diagnosis is via a physical examination or by medical imaging if necessary.

How to Treat Tennis Elbow?

There are a number of treatments available for tennis elbow, and healing time can depend on how you choose to treat the condition. If left untreated the pain and inflammation may heal by itself. However, this often leads to long-term issues and repeat lateral epicondylitis down the road if physical activity is pursued. The most basic form of treatment is to relax the muscle and release any build-up of stress, however, for a speedier and more wholesome recovery, further treatment is recommended.

Elbow to Heal

A common response is to prescribe an anti-inflammatory medication to treat the tennis elbow, although this will only mask the pain and reduce swelling without actually treating the condition. It is highly recommended to address this issue with physical therapy, which can work to both repair the lateral epicondylitis and strengthen the arm and affected area, which can highly reduce the likelihood of falling victim to the condition in the future.

An arm pain doctor can help with physiotherapy that uses a mixture of movement, strengthening, and alignment of the muscles, tendons, and bones that connect to the area. This type of treatment can be provided by a chiropractor and is one of the best current treatments and preventative measures to lateral epicondylitis.

An arm brace or strapping of the forearm may be provided in some cases to help with day to day pain and reduce stress to the area while you recover, and following recommendations like this can likely effect and significantly reduce the healing time of your tennis elbow.

To assist with the recovery of tennis elbow, massage techniques to complete at home are also commonly prescribed by arm pain doctors. These easy tasks complement any physiotherapy that has been undertaken and will relax the arm and tendons while also promoting further movement and strengthening to assist with a quicker recovery.

Lisa is a professional writer who enjoys spending time outdoors with her family. She has degrees in English and Secondary Education and has been writing professionally in the medical niche for the last three years, including pieces on dentistry, health, and fitness. Her interest in the medical field began with her mother’s job as a dental nurse, and she has continued to nurture her interest in learning extensively about the diagnosis and treatment of a range of conditions.